Fascinating Women

Keziah Arsenault- Fire master -Reiki Master- Shamanic healer- Passionate

July 02, 2024 Kez Arsenault Season 6 Episode 11
Keziah Arsenault- Fire master -Reiki Master- Shamanic healer- Passionate
Fascinating Women
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Fascinating Women
Keziah Arsenault- Fire master -Reiki Master- Shamanic healer- Passionate
Jul 02, 2024 Season 6 Episode 11
Kez Arsenault

Keziah Arsenault's journey is one of resilience, transformation, and fire—literally. In this captivating episode of the Fascinating Women podcast, Keziah shares how she evolved from a controlled upbringing to embracing her true passions. With a background in biological sciences, psychology, and veterinary medicine, she discovered her love for fire performance and became a prominent figure in the field. Keziah talks about the importance of pursuing one's passions, breaking free from societal expectations, and continuously seeking new experiences. Her story is a testament to the power of adaptability and following your intuition. Don't miss this episode filled with inspiring insights and the incredible tale of a woman who truly plays with fire.


Meet Keziah Arsenault: A Master of Fire and Transformation

Keziah Arsenault is a unique blend of science, art, and energy healing. With a deep respect for the wisdom of older generations, she uses her expertise in medical knowledge, psychology, life coaching, and energy therapy to help seniors achieve their post-retirement dreams.

 Keziah’s intuitive gift for understanding and assisting others has guided her for nearly 30 years. She has been an innate life coach, sensing the energy of people and places to help them navigate difficult times. This natural talent led her to formally embrace life coaching, where she now helps individuals live the lives they desire and deserve.

 Her mission is to renew passion for life, particularly for those feeling stagnant. By eliminating toxic and negative energies, she revives the zest for living.

 Keziah's journey began with studies in biological sciences and psychology, leading her to Europe for veterinary medicine. Returning to Calgary, she immersed herself in primary healthcare, further fueling her passion for senior care and mental health.

Now a master in Usui Reiki, Holy Fire Karuna Reiki, Shamanic healing, and Access Consciousness Bars, Keziah combines these disciplines to enrich her natural gifts and help others.


About Mark Laurie - Host.
Mark has been transforming how women see themselves, enlarging their sense of sexy, and expanding their confidence in an exciting adventure that is transformational photography.
http://innerspiritphotography.com
https://www.instagram.com/innerspiritphotography/

Sound Production by:
Lee Ellis  - myofficemedia@gmail.com  

Show Notes Transcript

Keziah Arsenault's journey is one of resilience, transformation, and fire—literally. In this captivating episode of the Fascinating Women podcast, Keziah shares how she evolved from a controlled upbringing to embracing her true passions. With a background in biological sciences, psychology, and veterinary medicine, she discovered her love for fire performance and became a prominent figure in the field. Keziah talks about the importance of pursuing one's passions, breaking free from societal expectations, and continuously seeking new experiences. Her story is a testament to the power of adaptability and following your intuition. Don't miss this episode filled with inspiring insights and the incredible tale of a woman who truly plays with fire.


Meet Keziah Arsenault: A Master of Fire and Transformation

Keziah Arsenault is a unique blend of science, art, and energy healing. With a deep respect for the wisdom of older generations, she uses her expertise in medical knowledge, psychology, life coaching, and energy therapy to help seniors achieve their post-retirement dreams.

 Keziah’s intuitive gift for understanding and assisting others has guided her for nearly 30 years. She has been an innate life coach, sensing the energy of people and places to help them navigate difficult times. This natural talent led her to formally embrace life coaching, where she now helps individuals live the lives they desire and deserve.

 Her mission is to renew passion for life, particularly for those feeling stagnant. By eliminating toxic and negative energies, she revives the zest for living.

 Keziah's journey began with studies in biological sciences and psychology, leading her to Europe for veterinary medicine. Returning to Calgary, she immersed herself in primary healthcare, further fueling her passion for senior care and mental health.

Now a master in Usui Reiki, Holy Fire Karuna Reiki, Shamanic healing, and Access Consciousness Bars, Keziah combines these disciplines to enrich her natural gifts and help others.


About Mark Laurie - Host.
Mark has been transforming how women see themselves, enlarging their sense of sexy, and expanding their confidence in an exciting adventure that is transformational photography.
http://innerspiritphotography.com
https://www.instagram.com/innerspiritphotography/

Sound Production by:
Lee Ellis  - myofficemedia@gmail.com  

introduction:

You're listening to fascinating women with Mark Laurie. And now, Mark Laurie.

Mark Laurie:

Hello, everyone, it's Mark Laurie here from fascinating women. And normally you will find me behind the camera photographing really neat women. But today we're going to talk to a really neat lady. She doesn't quite cover, she's more of a warrior, but we'll get into that later. So you have Kaz with us,

Kez Arsenault:

that'd be Kez. Always been Kez always will be Kez,

Mark Laurie:

please, I'm good, good to be corrected. She plays with fire, like sorry, for ways. But before we get into that, tell me three beliefs that guide you,

Kez Arsenault:

Three beliefs that guide me, Oh, that's good one, um way to put me on the spot. Put me put me on the spot. Three beliefs that guide me. I think that whatever your passion is, should be something you pursue, I think that if you have let yourself be overridden by others expectations, others beliefs, you're never gonna live the life that you want. And therefore, you know, if you believe that you can do it, do it, do the thing. Even if you fail, do the thing, at least you've done the thing. Second is, you know, whatever you're doing, it doesn't matter what anybody else is doing. So, you know, like, it's, it's, you be you just full stop be you, eventually you're going to get to a point where you realize that you're that your life is actually your own, it doesn't have absolutely anything to do with anybody else. And it's nobody else's business, what you do, so, you know, you do you, you'll be a hell of a lot happier. And you'll attract the kind of people that are really happy that you are you. And, you know, that applies to basically every area that you can possibly think of as we were just talking about, right? Like, you know, as it as as a Gen X, or it's like, I'm gonna do my thing, and you do your thing. And as long as everybody's happy, nobody's hurt anybody else. Okay, hey, let's go. Um, number three, experience as much as you can. Right? experience as experience as much as you can, if you want to change your career, do it. If you want to travel, do it, like Jesus, do it, do it, travel, experience, other perspectives, that is going to give you by far the most like personal growth that you're ever going to experiences is getting out there and seeing other cultures, how other people live, how other people think, like, be open to having conversations with these people. So that you can get a different perspective, because we're a little myopic here in North America, as we were just talking about as well. And you need, you need different perspectives to really understand the world and where you fit into it. If you, you know, if you stay in the same circles, and you stay in the same place, you're just going to be, you know, like this kind of it's, it's okay to want to be a study person. But if you really want to experience your full potential, you got to get out there and look at everything that is available to look at and talk to people and experience new things and try new foods for crying out loud. You know, the internet is not internet, it's not travel. book the ticket, fly to the place, talk to the people experienced the stuff.

Mark Laurie:

Have you always had this black life isn't the world?

Unknown:

No, no, I haven't. I grew up. I grew up in a really controlled environment. I did not actually have a lot of different perspectives in my life like I was I was a single child of two parents that did their thing. And there were a lot of expectations on me in regards to what I should do. And if I actually talked to my roommate about this yesterday, actually and it was the fact that none of my natural talents were ever really acknowledged. In fact, they were always. Well, that's nice. But, you know, you got to focus on this, you got to focus on your academics, right? Academics, academics, academics, don't get me wrong. I've got a beautiful brain. I can do academics all day long, it's still part of, it's still a big part of my life. Like, I know how to research, I know how to do all of the things that that something makes sense to me, I go and go. Alright, so where's the psychological backing for this? And usually, I'm right. Pattern Recognition. That's a wonderful thing. So when I got out of the control of my parents, and started to, like, really explore the world, it was really, really eye opening, because I often discovered people that went, you can do that. That's so cool. I went, it is. Really, I can do that. Yeah, you can do that. Oh, well, that's, that's amazing. And it would have been so nice. Had my parents ever said, Hey, you're a really amazing singer. We're gonna get you some vocal lessons. Or when we discovered that I had a natural affinity for speedskating. For example. Do you think my parents went you know, maybe we should foster this? No, my parents went where my mom went, hey, you know, you've got horses, and that's, that's your thing. Don't get me wrong. Don't get me wrong, I love my time with my horses. I do. But it's not like my horses, were going to be a career. It's not like I could, it's not like I was going to go to the Olympics. Right? The horse has saved my life, for sure. If I didn't have them, I would not have survived all of the bullying and all that kind of stuff. Because he hit six feet at 14. Schools, not easy school is not easy when you're very, very vastly different than anybody else. So when I got out, you know, I kind of went Oh, like, they're actually people who are interested me as a person that actually go, Hey, you got some talents. And that's really fucking phenomenal. And, and, but I still had that voice in my head of, you have to be this narrow, productive member of society. And like, I didn't, I didn't start doing fire, for example, until I was Oh, 2009. So that was 34. I didn't start doing anything like that. Until then. And you know, despite the fact that I had a serious affinity for theatrics, and drama, and dance and music,

Mark Laurie:

where those come from, like you, you've got no inclusion of them the first life, how did those suddenly become showcase?

Kez Arsenault:

it's you ever hear a song? And you get a vision in your head. So that's the way that my brain works. I had started doing point, which is the first prop I ever learned. So anybody who doesn't know what point are, most of you don't. They're balls on strings, and you spin them around yourself and intricate patterns. And there's hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of them. And then you you look back at that. And that's actually it's it's Maori dexterity training for Warriors. So I just saw my boyfriend back in 2000. Yeah, 2004 wanted to take lessons. And I got this. I got his lessons. Like I spoke lessons for Christmas. And I really picked it up. And he still kind of dabbled in it, but not really so much was me. I moved away to Europe. I went to vet school for a couple of years, I came back, that school became something that I couldn't do any more than veterinary medicine, which was my, like my big life goal and dominated just about everything that I did. There was just too There was too much resistance for me to be a vet. And so I gave it up. I don't know you're a creative person. So that whole right brain left brain thing. So I spent, you know, three decades, very in my left brain because it was, you know, is very, very interested in science. And of course, veterinary medicine is all about science. And so Science, Science, Science, Science, Science, my parents are going no arts, no arts, no arts. Despite the fact that my mother's graphic artists make that make sense. stuff. So veterinary medicine suddenly wasn't anything for me. But music always was there's always music in the background, my parents used to pitch me out for listening to music while I studied. And now of course, we have all of these studies going, hey, there are certain kinds of people that really, really need music in order to focus. And I remember coming back from from vet school for a visit, and my dad went, Hey, like, I just read this article in Maclean's, that said that they're these kinds of people. So we didn't do any favors, did we like it was a good thing. I didn't listen to you either. Right? Like, they had no idea that I had a strategy for these things. Music for me is a mnemonic device. So I would say one particular subject to one particular album, because we didn't have playlists or anything else back then we had cassette tapes. And so at the beginning of my test, I just start playing music in my head. So music has always been an indicator for me. And I'm just kind of naturally gifted. In regards to anything musical. I can mimic Amy Lee from Evanescence, for example. I have been told multiple, multiple times that I really should monetize my singing and I still haven't quite figured out how I'm going to do it. But there's anybody out there who wants to create an evidences Evanescence tribute band, I'm your girl. I am your girl. So suddenly losing that big focusing element that I had a veterinary medicine as the big, big goal. My right brain, which I just kind of always play K with music. Kind of what? Hey, hi. Remember this creative thing that remember this creative person that you actually really, really are, you know, we should possibly do something with them. So I just came back from Europe. I had connected to a whole community of fire spinners here in Calgary, I'd spent fire for the first time and I got instantly addictive. I was driving around, I was driving on Deerfoot and a song came on the radio. And in the space of that three and a half minute song, I choreographed a full six person fire. Thing, fire performance. And I formed my entertainment company, Firestorm entertainment now for our strong productions, three months later. And we had our first show two months after that. And I've been going ever since. So it's, it's one of those things that, you know, and I mean, I'm very, very much diagnosed ADHD now. I look back at it now. And I'm just like, Oh, okay. Yeah, the need for music to study and, and like, all this kind of stuff. And I've been ADHD my entire my entire life. And you look at at the characteristics of people who have ADHD, and we have these little hidden talents, because we've been collecting all of these little pieces of information. You know, like, I can hold a stage. With no training, I can hold a stage better than some people who have like formal stage training, I can hold the stage further than they can. And it's just because I've been watching them for years and years and years and years and years. I've watched them and I've watched the audience, I go, Okay, there's the connection right there. Right, that's the connection. And all you have to do is get on stage and apply it. And it can be taught but for some people like me, it's natural. So it's, it's, it was very much an innate thing. I always have the abilities, but I was never encouraged to use them. And then I came back with my main goal gone, I went okay, well, I've got all of this energy now. I'm not going to put it into the corporate world. Thank you very much. Like that's, that's just a job. I have to have something else to do. And yeah, starting to play with fire and hearing that song that one song started everything which has been going on ever since.

Mark Laurie:

I mentioned in Europe changing all Europe

Unknown:

translate a lot. So you ever lived alone?

Mark Laurie:

Actually, I have briefly briefly, very short periods of time.

Unknown:

So I moved from my parents place in with my boyfriend and then immediately another boyfriend after that. Right so I've always lived with other people, and always been kind of taking care of other people. Moving to Europe was my First big me doing me for me movement. And I had moved to Slovakia. But I was an English speaking veterinary school, and the whole the whole little town that we're in the city that we're in just 1300 years old, this is the first time I got to experience actual history. So this was this was like the first big move that was just for me, there was nobody there to catch me, there was nobody there to support, I had nobody else that I needed to support, right, like, this was just me for me. And, you know, I'm suddenly interacting with Israelis and Swedes, and, you know, everybody, like, represented representation from, you know, all corners of the UK. And it was fascinating. It was just an I was the only Canadian to so culturally, it was really, really fun. And really, really funny. I remember having a conversation, I got invited to basically the British party, that was our that was our classmate, or British classmates, they all got together, and they invited me because, you know, we're technically Commonwealth. And if you have been around British people at all, you know that they take the piss out of each other a lot, especially in regards to how they speak. So you've got the Yorkshire and the Londoner beefing, you've got the Midlands girl, and you've got the Irish girl and you've got the there are a lot of actually most of my British classmates, we're all women. You've got the Scottish girl and they're all just kind of beefing. And then somebody says, and then there's the Canadiens just, I've just been observing all of this, and I can understand all of them perfectly. Like okay, so your biggest thing is that you can understand each other. Right? Right. Okay, so Can all of you understand me? Yes. Because you're so boring, you have no accent. Here's the thing, I can understand all of you, Sue, who actually has a pure at like, who actually has a, who has a greater understanding and a pure understanding of the language me Are you and they just like, Shut up with each other. Oh, my Slovak teachers realize that, that I did actually have like the most understandable accent out of all of the class. And so if they wanted if they wanted, you know, to understand how to actually say something, they switched from talking to some of the British ones who were teaching them slang, to talking to me, and there was a little bit of bitterness, which I found really, really funny. But it's like, no, you know what, it's just, it's just what it is like, this is the this is a nice thing about not having, you know, a really, really strong accent. The western Canadian accent is pretty pure. When you really, really think about it, it's very easy to understand. And we talk slowly too. So. But they while

Mark Laurie:

you're learning in current school with us at the veterinary stuff that was mentioned. Yep.

Unknown:

Yep. So that was that was really, really interesting, you know, because we're still Baqia had just joined the EU, it wasn't quite part of it yet. But they had been accepted. And they were now in the process of doing all of the things economically that they needed to do. And they had just actually formally become part of the EU when I left. So there was a big, like, socio economical change. But when I landed the first day, and I'm looking at the outskirts, of course, she'd say, which is the eastern capital, and I'm looking at this going, I'm in I'm in like, Prussian capitalist hell, what the fuck have I gotten myself into a Russian communist hell, because everything is just these, these big square concrete blocks of buildings, right that you always see in, in, you know, former Slovak, or former socialist or former USSR controlled company countries. But then I got into like flat now, which is Main Street. It's the old town. It's the historical center, of course, you'd say. And the year that I got there, their Neo gothic cathedral was 800 years old. I lived right down the street from it in a little flat. I was walking down 1300 year cobbles, 1300 year old cobbles on my way to my university, which is about half an hour that way. Every single day, like I was in my happy place. And when I go back to Calgary, I'm like you Korea's 100 years old. Korea's Got no history. Concrete is only known for the stampede. What am I doing? Why? Well, I went back here. Remember,

Mark Laurie:

I was teaching in Wales and throw Europe as well for a while. And I'm seeing this house, it's got the ear of the house is built. And it wasn't considered an old home in that town wasn't considered an old date. Right. And it's a couple 100 years old, at least right. It was built long before we had Confederation. Just it there's a there's a moment when you realize that that the world shifts inside. Yeah. What is your most favorite personality trait is

Unknown:

adaptability, I would say I'm a Gemini. And while I don't really ascribe a whole hell of a lot to astronomy at the same time, so I was born a month late. I was supposed to be I was supposed to have been a Taurus. But I was I was literally born a month late. And that back then they didn't induce right, so I was born smack dab in the middle of Gemini. And I look at some of my personality traits. Now I look at the way that I really interact with the world. And then the chameleon. Anybody. There's a there's a friend of mine that I talk to in Ontario all the time. And he's been going through a lot of health issues. And so he comes to me for some explanations. And so we'll be talking about performance stuff, cuz he's my main fire mentor is my fire god. And so we'll be talking about a boy talking about performance stuff. And then we'll start talking about health stuff. And I've got some very, very distinct personality, personalities, right. They're all integrated. I'm not, you know, it's not a, I don't have a path of logical separation of personalities. But I definitely have some very distinct personalities, depending on what it is that I'm talking about. So if I'm talking about performance, I talk slightly differently than when I'm talking about, say something like medicine or psychology. And he, we've talked about, he does kind of same thing, but mine is much, much bigger in scope. And he will, we'll be talking, talking, talking and he'll go, Jesus, that's fascinating. Like, what it's like, I'm talking to, I'm talking to the professor right now, right now aren't safe, right? Because that's kind of my teaching persona. Right? And I might, yeah, yeah, pretty much. And he's like, your entire, and we're not talking on the phone, we're not talking on video, we're just talking through chat. He's like your writing pattern changes. Your the way that you use word changes, when we have been on video, he's like your entire, like your entire presence changes. And he didn't even he and I've never actually like formally met in person, because he's an Ontarian. I've never actually gotten over there. But it's kind of one of those things that, that if you know me long enough, and we talk long enough about different amounts of, of subjects, especially ones that I'm quite well versed on, you'll actually see my personality actually will change. And then if you look at my performance personality, so Phoenix is my performance personality. And she is probably the most distinct out of all of them. Because she's a lot of what I'm not in real life. And a lot of people get this really, really confused. She's far more separated than all the rest of them. The rest of them are all really, really integrated. And I can pull information from every single one of them because there's just kind of like these. In my head. There's like, there's rooms, right? There's a psychology room, and then there's the medical room and there's like there's different rooms for where I have expertise. The Phoenix herself is in a green room pretty much by herself. And so when I get into Phoenix mode, I can talk to anybody. I am really really confident I you know, like I command the room I command the stage right like she's very, very distinct when I put her away actually lose access to some of The memory that she holds. So I'll be out, and somebody will come up and go, Oh my god, I saw you. It's like, it's so great to see you. We met, you know, here, here, here. And I'm just like, I'm like, I'm really, really sorry. I'm terrible with names, terrible faces and all this kind of stuff. And that's, that's the excuse, because they gave me the context that they met me while I'm performing. And I don't remember you, because I'm not in that mode. If I met you, while I was still Phoenix, right? Or if we were at another show, I'd 100% recognize you. But there's kind of a distinction there. But the rest of everything that I have is, you know, it's it's really, really adaptable. It's I can just I can change directions on a fly, and I just put on an entirely different personality and go off that way.

Mark Laurie:

That is, what personality bounce that do you wish you had, what character character trait do you wish you had? That

Unknown:

I wish I had, I wish I had her drive and her confidence. More. I wish that wasn't a mask that I put on, I actually kind of wished that was something that was more integrated into my personality, just because it would be I get so much more done. I get so much more done, I wish I would have accomplished so much more, if I could actually access her, her confidence, and her just ability to do anything in the moment. But unfortunately, she keeps that in her greenroom and her her dressing room and, and only lets it out every once in a while. So

Mark Laurie:

what was the turning point in your life? Europe, Europe was a big thing. Europe was too big.

Unknown:

I was 31 I moved to Europe. I came back when I was 33. And that was yeah, that was the big, big turning points, right. Because I I had every intention of finishing, I really, really did. And I actually had plans to stay in Europe, there was no reason for me to come back to Canada. And the only reason why I did was because I grossly overestimated what being a Commonwealth citizen meant in terms of what I could do in the UK. And I honestly thought like, Okay, I'm a Commonwealth citizen. Okay, so you know, like, you know, Britain is the homeland, we've got the queen. And I was in the EU, of which of course, the UK was part of at the time, I was in the EU and I was getting EU degree. So you know, if if you are was kept, if you are an EU citizen with an EU degree, you can practice anywhere, you don't have to take any of the entry exams or anything else like that, that you need to in order to qualify to practice something myself. At the time, I was led to believe that being a Commonwealth citizen with an EU degree meant that I should be able to just practice in the in the EU. And that turned out to not be true. So I came back to Canada with the intention of transferring into one of the Canadian universities with, you know, two years of straight A's. And they went, What the fuck is this? Like, we don't recognize any of this, like we can't recognize any of this. And you'd have to start over I'd have to start over again and actually have to take part of my BSC over again. I'm like, Nah, there's not a chance like, I'm not going to do it. But as my grandfather said, Because I he had helped. He was my main support, and through all of this and he had helped actually fund me to go over there. And I went grandpa look like things are I can't start over again. Like I'm 33 by the time I'm by the time I am finished, I'm going to be like 36 I'm going to be even more in debt because the European school that I was going to was way less expensive by almost a quarter than what it would be here. It's just was not going to be feasible and I kind of look like you funded this. So I really need your I really need your take on me letting it go. And he said you have you don't know how much you've changed in the last two years but I can see it and simply for that fact. I will call you Your experience in Europe a, like a complete success. Like, I have never ever thought that education of any sort was any sort of a waste, right? I've never used my Education for anything other than being able to research and critical thinking, you know? So for, you know, like my main supporter to go, yeah. Like, we didn't know if you could do it. You proved us wrong. It's like, I'm ridiculously proud of you. And, you know, go on and do what it is that that you're going to do next. But, you know, ultimately, this fundamentally changed you into a very well rounded, adult. And, you know, big, big thumbs up. And unfortunately, he died a year later. And I've been devastated ever since. But Europe was Europe was the big one, Europe was the big, big one, and then forming Firestorm a year after that the year after getting home was just like, it was a very unexpected path. But anybody who knows, like me, who knew me before Europe, and they see me now they're just like, this is this is, this is who you are. This is who we always saw, we just didn't know what the expression was going to come out looking like.

Mark Laurie:

So you're talking because she's really a form of a looking AI? They just think what do you want to know it's come back and pull it back out?

Unknown:

Yeah, I'm very tangential. But I there's always there's a point to just like, Kate, there's that there's the main line. And we have to just kind of there's there's feeders into the main line as to why the main line is the way the main line is.

Mark Laurie:

That's the best advice you've received.

Unknown:

Oh. You know, that one is tricky. Because most of the advice that I have ever gotten has been conformity instability. Right. And if I look at my life, and the way that I've kind of lived it, I kind of do things in light of the rest of what I have been advised to do. You know, I don't, I don't take advice very well. Most, because most of the advice that I have ever gotten has been really dated. It no longer applies to the world. It's people trying to get me to fit their mold. And if you know anything about me at this point, we kind of know that I don't do molds very well. They just don't fit any of this. So it's kind of people can feel free to give me their advice. And I will take the nuggets that actually makes sense. But I don't actually think I've ever followed. No, I've actually never felt No, I've never ever followed anybody's advice. I don't think I have I've, I've kind of gone. Okay, that makes sense. And it makes sense coming from you. And that makes sense. You know, that makes sense for the world that you grew up in. But I I kind of take my advice from lived experience. I kind of take advice from watching other people and go okay, that makes sense to me. I don't seek out advice too terribly much. And if somebody feels the need to impart advice onto me, I will listen very respectfully. And I'll usually turn around do exactly opposite to that

Mark Laurie:

how you define success?

Unknown:

Oh, God. I mean, it's been it's been beaten into me that success is materialistic. And while I understand that mindset I think from my personal perspective and my life, success comes from respect. So while I may not have had what anybody would have, would whatever account to for, you know, like real commercial success. I've been struggling being self employed for the last seven years. And there's a whole bunch of reasons for that. However, in the time that I have kind of just created things out of the ether, that have surprisingly worked. Even if they weren't a monetary success, even if they weren't a materialistic success, even if I can't go, Hey, like, you know, like, I have a paid off house and a paid off car, and you know, I've got, you know, I can travel all over the world, and I've got $500,000 in the bank. At the same time, me following my instincts have led to things that have actually paid other people to do what they love. And my name is known in, like, the circus industry across Canada. My name is known. And that to me, like so people come to me still all the time, despite the fact that the program that I had, is not at play right now. And we're trying to revive it. Because I, I worked with a broker and we created a cross Canada performers insurance policy, and I have been the president of a circus performers professional association for eight years now. I think. So my name is known and spoken of, and sought after across Canada, and has been for almost a decade. Right. So to me, that's, you know, that is, it's actually really, rather large measure of success. It hasn't come with a whole lot of cash rewards to it. But at the same time, you know, walking into a space with circus performers and introducing myself like, that's you that like that, you know, like, so? It's it just depends on what you define as success. But for right now, that's, you know, that level of respect, for me, is a big measure of success. What's failure? Failure. I don't really view failure the way that a lot of people do, I guess, well, I mean, I view failure the way that most entrepreneurs do, and that failure isn't. failure isn't a negative thing. It's a learning opportunity. So every time I fail at something, I look at what I learned from it, and I try and change it the next time I do it. I think that failure would be meeting a hurdle and not attempting to go over it. Right? Even if you go through the hurdle, you still learn something. Even if you have to stop and look at the hurdle to figure out how to go over it, you've learned something. Failure is giving up. And while I have definitely had periods where I'm kind of going, okay, is this worth it? Do I want to continue to pour so much energy into things that are really for community, right? Like this is this is not me growing my personal brand, or anything else like that? It is? It is literally for the community at large, and I'm still fighting for that. But there's a lot of stuff that doesn't, you know, like you don't get a lot back. Right? Like, it's not like I've got people beating down my door, hey, hey, I want to hang out. You're the coolest person ever, like all this kind of stuff. And I'm not expecting that. But at the same time, you know, you go okay, you know, regardless of whether or not you know, there's reciprocation, from the community that I'm trying to serve. I am still trying to serve them. And that's a good enough reason for me.

Mark Laurie:

What do you say you represent? Your Is it your gen Gen Z? Your Gen X Gen X brother. I'm sorry. Teresa's handled

Unknown:

Gen Z Gen Z is the one that said that's just coming up like they just turned they're in their early 20s Now I think or they're in like elementary school and all that kind of stuff still? I think so. I would say so. Um, I'm especially representative Gen X, Canada, right? Like if you look at Gen X and in any other country, of course there's all these cultural Roll, foibles of about things, but Gen X. Growing up Gen X, in a progressive socialist society that we had Yeah, I would say so. I would say so I I'm very, very accepting of the way people want to live. I am extremely furious about what's happening right now in regards to the way that that all the rights that we fought for and grew up with, or being taken away. I don't think I met I'm as apathetic as a lot of Gen Xers are, right, like they kind of went alright, well, our work is done. And so we're just going to coast from now on, I do continue to try and progress society in the way that I grew up, right. Like, you think about the messaging that we got when we were kids. of Canada with the peacekeepers. Right, that was our identity. That was my, that was our identity, the entire time that I was in school, Canada were the peacekeepers. And we got involved, whether, you know, if it was if it was a war torn country, we had refugees, there was a call every week every week for money for clothing, for blankets for supplies, like, like, you name it, we're like we were, that's how we grew up. This is who Canada is Canada, peacekeepers were the helpers. And I think there's probably still a good section of us that still really believe that's kind of our role. And the fact that we don't do that anymore, was a rather debilitating realization, realizing that that's not the Canadian identity anymore. And for somebody like, like, my generation that grew up with that, as our like, main identity, it's, it's heartbreaking. It's really, really heartbreaking. And I can't, I can't describe how heartbreaking it was when I like I kind of made that realization back in the fall of last year, and I kind of went this isn't I don't recognize, I don't recognize this country at all anymore. And I know a lot of Gen Xers that are all feeling that way too. It's like who who have we become because this isn't it? This isn't what we were told that we were this is what we all worked towards. This is what we molded society as we came of age, right? Like we took all of that acceptance and progression and we molded society with it. And a lot of people don't recognize that. And it's, it's, it's sad now you're watching everything that you grew up with and that you helped to build being ripped to shreds. And they still say that Gen X didn't contribute anything to make I am let me just devalue particular notion cuz we create it. If we were we were the progenitors of the of the world that you currently live in. Right, all of the acceptance, the mental health, the social media for good or for ill you know, like that all came from us secular society started with genetics. And, and now we're watching it roll violently backwards, and it's really disheartening. Anybody else index feels but the ones that I keep up with and just like, I don't understand what's going on, like a tiller stick.

Mark Laurie:

That's wild. Well, I think we'll wrap it up. That was amazing conversation.

Unknown:

Yes. I've never actually got to talking about the fire aspect of

Mark Laurie:

that's a different conversation. So for listeners, there'll be a whole bio piece if you want to reach out to her and learn a bit more and get involved in her circuit. She is literally the girl that ran away to the circus. I love that.

Kez Arsenault:

I didn't run away the circus. I created my own create your

Mark Laurie:

own circuits, create my own circuits even bigger, that's even bigger. Thank you so much.

Kez Arsenault:

Thank you very much for having me, Mark.

Exit speaker:

This has been fascinating women with Mark Laurie. Join us on our website and subscribe at fascinating women does he a fascinating women has been sponsored by inner spirit photography of Calgary, Alberta and is produced in Calgary by Leigh Ellis and my office media.