Fascinating Women

Jennie Bellinger - Rock Star Mom - Coach - Life of the Party - Curious - Marketing Expert

July 30, 2020 Jennie Bellinger Season 1 Episode 18
Fascinating Women
Jennie Bellinger - Rock Star Mom - Coach - Life of the Party - Curious - Marketing Expert
Chapters
Fascinating Women
Jennie Bellinger - Rock Star Mom - Coach - Life of the Party - Curious - Marketing Expert
Jul 30, 2020 Season 1 Episode 18
Jennie Bellinger

Jennie Bellinger - shares her insights on how she became a new "same" person by showing up authentically. How she became business-focused, her ADD helped with hyperfocus. Why she loves to help people. Navigating a divorce for the benefit of her children. Finding the best of situations.

Her interview is a warm, joyful conversation filled with perspectives that will help anyone.


Jennie's Bio & Contacts
Jennie Bellinger is better known as The Direct Sales Domme. She's the host of the Badass Direct Sales Mastery podcast and helps rock star direct sales moms whip their business into shape. Jennie is a Certified Professional Coach, so her methods aren't painful, but are very effective.

My email is jennie@badassdirectsalesmastery.com

Listeners can reach out to me by email or through my website: https://www.badassdirectsalesmastery.com

My Facebook link is https://www.facebook.com/JennieBPL

About Mark Laurie - Host.
Mark has been transforming how women see themselves, enlarging their sense of sexy, expanding their confidence in an exciting adventure that is transformational photography.
http://innerspiritphotography.com

Sound Production by:
Lee Ellis  - myofficemedia@gmail.com
Reach out to Lee for your Sound Production.

Show Notes Transcript

Jennie Bellinger - shares her insights on how she became a new "same" person by showing up authentically. How she became business-focused, her ADD helped with hyperfocus. Why she loves to help people. Navigating a divorce for the benefit of her children. Finding the best of situations.

Her interview is a warm, joyful conversation filled with perspectives that will help anyone.


Jennie's Bio & Contacts
Jennie Bellinger is better known as The Direct Sales Domme. She's the host of the Badass Direct Sales Mastery podcast and helps rock star direct sales moms whip their business into shape. Jennie is a Certified Professional Coach, so her methods aren't painful, but are very effective.

My email is jennie@badassdirectsalesmastery.com

Listeners can reach out to me by email or through my website: https://www.badassdirectsalesmastery.com

My Facebook link is https://www.facebook.com/JennieBPL

About Mark Laurie - Host.
Mark has been transforming how women see themselves, enlarging their sense of sexy, expanding their confidence in an exciting adventure that is transformational photography.
http://innerspiritphotography.com

Sound Production by:
Lee Ellis  - myofficemedia@gmail.com
Reach out to Lee for your Sound Production.

introduction :

You're listening to fascinating women with Mark Laurie. And now, Mark Laurie.

Mark Laurie :

Good morning fans. This is Mark Laurie from inner spirit photography. Today, of course, I'm hosting fascinating women. And my guest is Jenny. Now Jenny goes back a long ways with me. And I've been sort of watching her interact with people and she is the most delightful, curious person at the same time. Now, my day job when I'm doing their spirit photography, I had come across some most incredible women. And so that's what our spirit photography transitioned into fascinating women is one of its outlets. And today we're going to explore what makes Jenny tick. Welcome, Jenny.

Jennie Bellinger :

Thanks so much for having me. I'm so glad to be here. Mark.

Mark Laurie :

This is great. I you just had a storm you said last night that created an outage so that may create some interesting connection problems.

Jennie Bellinger :

Maybe fingers crossed that everything's okay but

Mark Laurie :

we'll see. It may happen sofa here, frozen voice thing that that's probably what it is. So you are highly energetic. Like, every time I've met you, you're this radiating ball of enthusiasm and possibilities. Did that start at a young age with you always that way or is it something you have acquired?

Jennie Bellinger :

Pretty much this has been me my whole life. Yeah. I mean, it just is I I'm the oldest in my family. And this is you know, this is just who I am. I guess I got it from my parents, I guess.

Mark Laurie :

So what are the earlier lessons did you recall the set you on this path? Like you could have bubbly personalities can go in so many directions. But how did you want to put this particular path in the young age what was started to the path young age?

Jennie Bellinger :

I think it was growing up in the military, um, because you know, when you're moving every two to three years, you have got to find a way to quickly connect with people and being positive bubbly helps. You know, I was I was a little bit shyer in my earlier ages. And it was when I moved when I was about 15. I was 15 years old when I moved to the St. Louis area. And I had an epiphany. Because, you know, of course, when you're that age, you are very socially referenced. Meaning, you know, everything is about your friends, and I had just finally made some really good friends and I had started dating this really nice boy. And then the Air Force said, No, you have to leave. And I was really, really depressed when we got here for about three weeks. And all of a sudden, I had this moment of the only person this depression and it was almost like my depression was like, revenge at my parents for making a move. Right. And so I had this moment where I went, I'm the only one who's really being affected by this. You know, because Now as a parent, I realized that me being angry, upset and hurt was hurting them too. But back then I didn't realize it to that extent. And I thought, well, I'm in a new place. Nobody here knows what I was like. I can be whoever I want to be. reinvent yourself, who do I want to be? So I became outgoing, air quotes around outgoing. And I made a promise to myself that when school started back up, I was going to talk to one new person in every single class every single day. So at the end of my first week, because there were seven periods in school, I would have 35 new people in my in my life, and that's what I did. I taught one new person every single time, introduce myself to people and just really became the social butterfly of my school. I wasn't I wasn't the person. I wasn't a cheerleader. I wasn't acquire kid I wasn't a jock or an athlete or anything like that. But I knew all of them. I wasn't a stoner, but I knew the stoners. I knew like I knew everybody. And I was friends with everybody. And that's where a lot of that started because I was like, I can be whoever I want to be. So who I want to be I want to be friendly.

Mark Laurie :

So did you sit down? Is this like an actual thought process? You sat down your bed and go, how am I gonna do this? Yeah, so you actually theoretically created an avatar for yourself in today's terminology that you sat back and said, Okay, this is this is sketching out who I want to be. This is my new my new map

Jennie Bellinger :

pretty much because it at my first high school I had been the the shy, smart, mousy girl, I only had like two or three really good friends. And that was it. And there's nothing wrong with that. But I also knew that I, you know, if I had the chance to be whoever I want to be, who knows? I want to be so that's when I started thinking, well, I want to be more outgoing. I want to know more people because I'm in a new place. So I, you know, but I also don't want to screw up and start hanging out with the wrong crowd. Yeah, you know,

Mark Laurie :

because those few this will happen when you're 15 years old. But this approach to things exists anywhere, like when you start a new job. When you do this to a new circle, you become the person that I recall that book when, as various organizations I've been with because I kind of had this similar type of thing when I didn't block a particular group. I knew all of them. One side thing I did notice, though, because it wasn't part of the group is if I was with them when they're making plans, I'd be invited along but because it wasn't part of their core group, if they were planning something they wouldn't often call me to invite me. I found that was was sort of something that kind of kicked into it, if I heard about it and asked to come along, as always welcome, but I wasn't part of the group. So I wasn't always invited. Which was an interesting kind of observation I had.

Jennie Bellinger :

Yeah, absolutely. And I think that's, I think what you bring up is absolutely true. In that you can if you're starting any new thing, you know, you have the opportunity to pick who you how you present yourself, you don't have to be the person you can try on new versions of yourself, you know, and they become, you know, you and I have a mutual friend Scott, Scott Conway, who talks about facet truths. It's not that you're not being yourself. It's just you're trying on a new facet of yourself. And there's nothing wrong with that. So it's it's funny when I started my podcast, there were a whole lot of people who were like, really, they were kind of shocked about the the persona that I put on for that I was like, Oh, you this is not fake. You just haven't seen the side of me because you're not in my bedroom.

Mark Laurie :

For clarifying for the audience, you should name tell people what your podcast is called.

Jennie Bellinger :

Oh, yeah, absolutely. So my podcast is called badass direct sales mastery and I am the direct sales Dom who helps whip or who helps women whip their business into shape. So there were quite a few people who had no idea that that part of me existed. I mean, they had seen me take leadership roles they just didn't realize that writing crops could be involved

Mark Laurie :

Yeah, that's this go back this particular thing where people meet you and I find it fascinating because you what, a lot of people I think think people to take pay more attention how they show up for the first time. Because when you that whole phrase that says you don't have a second chance to make the first good impression. It's bigger than that. I think when you first arrive when you're first introduced, when you first make your parents know People lock that in. You're humble, you're outgoing, you're energetic, you're mouthy. You're whatever it happens to be. And those first couple of traits that they ascertain, do they stick? And they change, I believe. And I think we we should always pay attention how we want to present ourselves in each kind of group.

Jennie Bellinger :

Yeah, it's definitely something to consider as you're moving forward. But here's the thing. If you are always yourself, it doesn't matter. Yeah, it's so much easier if you are truly authentic and not scared to be who you are. And you know, while Yes, I understand that there are people in the world who are going to be completely turned off by the fact that I discussed BDSM kink in relation to business. That's okay, because they're not my tribe. Right?

Mark Laurie :

Yeah. People should also know too that life's evolution like you see stuff now in social media is digging things up public shaming thing, they'll go back 1520 years will comment to the person made casually some cases and they'll beat them up with it today as if you can't change. And I believe as people evolve especially if you're an aware person like you've decided to, to look at your conduct, look at the world decide to grow and become bigger and better and different. That as you show up as your authentic self shows up it changes like what you are today is not the same person hopefully that you were 10 years ago.

Jennie Bellinger :

Oh gosh, now, thank goodness.

Mark Laurie :

You have a chance to recover stuff.

Jennie Bellinger :

Oh my gosh, yeah, I know many people who who probably would have known me 1012 years ago before I got into business. While I am the same person. I'm not the same person and you know it which sounds really weird to say. But but that's because I show up authentically I was still this bubbly, happy, you know love to meet people will love and Intelligence loves to have interesting conversations. But I was not business focused because I came from the world teaching. Right? And so once I got into business, like the add the hyper focus kicked in, that's how add people work, which is absolutely shocking to anybody who's not add. They think we can't focus and it's like, No, we definitely can focus because once we find something that we have salutely love. Mm hmm. We will hyper focus and for me, I love being in business. I love working with people on their businesses. And that So, I'm, I'm the same person, but I'm not the same person. But

Mark Laurie :

there's a group that I subscribed to there. Colby, Colby, and she has a her basic 30s actually, her dad developed with her and then she's on her own. He's passed away, but her belief is that you have a core almost like your alligator brain. core beliefs and kicked in. So what are you what would be your core beliefs, beliefs that you started with you still hold that define you? In your mind?

Jennie Bellinger :

I would have to say, looking for the best in people positivity. I'm looking for the best in situations honestly. I would also say, being open, open minded was also something that was promoted to me as a child by my parents, you know, we we, being in the Air Force, you live in a somewhat diverse culture. It could always be more diverse. Because Because the American military is by choice, you get who joins the military and that's it right? Yeah. But it was really, I was brought up in a you know, love people. Love people for who they are and try to see the best thing them and try to bring out the best in every situation. Because that's really all we have because in 30 days we could be living in another state we could be living in another country right now. So just always looking for the best so it was always every time we we got our orders to move it was okay guys, time for our next adventure is how it was presented to us. The only time it was a problem was when I 15 the next adventure and one of my friends,

Mark Laurie :

I like this adventure is going quite well. Thank you very much.

Jennie Bellinger :

I have got a boyfriend, why are you making me move?

Mark Laurie :

So besides the move in your childhood? Is there any big other event that that sort of challenged you or altered your path?

Jennie Bellinger :

Mm hmm. Um interestingly enough, um, so I started dating a guy in college who you I ended up making a huge impact in my life just because I he was emotionally and verbally abusive, which it was one of those things where came on very slowly. And so by the time I finally left him you know it, he had completely broken me down to the point where he was never physically abusive, but the I swear emotional and verbal abuse can be more damaging than physical abuse, I think because the scars are, you know, the bruises and stuff that often goes away the emotional and, you know, verbal abuse sticks with you for a really, really really long time. And it has it's literally taken me decades to work through those emotions and and those those thoughts that he put into my head because I came from somebody else. And so going through that, that transition. So when I hear someone, you know, whether it's a client or not, say, you know, I'm not good enough or I'm not pretty enough or, you know, can't believe I'm that stupid bla bla bla, I can empathize with that, because I've been in that place where I'm like, Oh my god, you know. But I, that was, I think, for me, I wouldn't change going through that process. Because it made me who I am today, everything I've gone through, made me who I am today and I won't. I wouldn't change any of it if I had the opportunity to.

Mark Laurie :

I really grew up with epilepsy, grand mal and Petit mal stuff. And that at the time was interesting, but today, I started my photography career, that gave me a whole bunch of empathy that I probably may have gotten, maybe it could inherit, but it really amplified and I going back and tinkering with your past is like a ripple going forward. It's a it's a dangerous thing to do although I read a book one time was on time travel which fascinated me. And he the author is talking about how you can go back in time and change the events and that that really intrigued me and what I started reading what he meant was you can go back in time to event that was bothering somebody. And then you can change your perspective of it almost like you shift over sideways as you view it. And suddenly you see it differently. And then I feel that often happens in movies where the there's a couple and one leaves or doesn't go to college and they then the damage to the purse, they come back they discover well, gee, I my father was dying I had this day it was a private thing couldn't share with anybody. And suddenly the whole, everything changes for them. And it's it's discovering, I guess that's part of looking through other people's eyes, trying to get a sense of what it is like to walk in their shoes and bring that back to them. When you have something like that in your experience, and I hear that a lot. Because with our photography, it's transformation style photography. So we hear a lot of people's backstories are coming to us for some time change that they put a small voice in your head. Mm hmm. And it's, it's really, really hard to change. Who inspires you?

Jennie Bellinger :

Oh, um, I'm gonna start with my kids. Mm hmm. Um, they're the reason I get up every day. And do

Mark Laurie :

Because they want breakfast, right? Well, yeah,

Jennie Bellinger :

that's a good start. Right? Um, but in terms of in terms of knowing that they're watching me because I have two girls. So girls tend to watch mom to see what's possible see what is is available to them. And, and so I know based on how much I watched my mom, you know how much my girls are watching me. And so I'm doing my best to present an authentic version of myself because I don't try and hide parts of me, but also always trying to be my best for them so that you know, they can see what's possible. I would also say that my clients inspire me. I mean, just seeing what they do and what they go through. Hugely inspiring. And then there are many coaches in my life, who I absolutely love and adore because they just bring new things into my life all the time. Virginia muskies being one of them, love her love her love her absolutely freaking brilliant. And then Scott Conway, I mean, just his ohana way has taken who I am to the next level, just because it's so nice to be Be able to say it. Because as somebody who's in the sales coaching world, many times back when I was in a sales position, trying to bring in other people into my organization, I would hear so often from people. Oh, of course you can do it because you're you. Yes. And I'm like, you can do this too. This is absolutely if I can learn it, you can learn it because I was not a salesperson either. When I started, I was a stay at home mom who came from the world of academia. I was I was educating middle schoolers, you know, I was teaching space science nerdiest thing in the history of ever, you know, and here I am, you know, now, in a I was in a sales position. And so, to hear from Scotland learn his ohana away and see, oh, there's a way to teach people authenticity, there's a way to teach people how to be their noble and best versions of themselves all the time because there's a system behind it. I just accidentally grew up ohana, I didn't know it. And there were just certain things that I needed to focus on to to improve upon. But now I knew exactly what I needed to do because of the system. So that that has been a huge inspiration to me so much so that eventually I'm going to get when I when I can get a tattoo again. I'm going to tattoo it on a tattoo ohana. I have Scotts permission to tattoo it on my body. So

Mark Laurie :

there you go. The tattoos are fun. When I started off, I'm going to photography for 40 years this year. And when we started off the it was pretty easy to tell who was just a regular woman for lack of a different word. dancer strippers, back then dance if a person has a dancer, they're always a stripper and Because if you're a dancer, you define what it was. I'm ballroom dancer, I'm gogo dancer and whatever it is, but right anyways, because the dancers always had dancers and biker girls there. They had tattoos. Yeah. Okay. And everyone else like horrified and the women did. And now it's been flipped around. And quite often you'll come across girls who are dancing, and they don't do tattoos at all. And, and all the regular girls have got them. These very, very exotic tattoos are they're kind of like,

Jennie Bellinger :

Oh, yeah, no, and it's something that, you know, for my parents bring me up in the way that they did. They're, they're pretty horrified that I have tattoos. Because I've already got two of them. And interestingly enough, my first tattoo was inspired by the guy who, who broke me down because I needed a constant reminder to love myself. And so my my first tattoo is the Japanese kanji for love, and it's in my favorite color purple. But it was it was really about you know, every time I looked in the mirror, I, you know, so I made sure it was front and center it but also because I knew I was eventually going to be going into some sort of job, I needed to be covered. So whenever I come out of the shower, I can see it it's on my belly. But it was for me it wasn't for anybody else. It was my reminder love myself love me, you know. And so that's why that's their second tattoo covering a scar.

Mark Laurie :

We had with one client that came in and she had a badly done tattoo for a youth and so this little tiny thing so she went to a tattoo I said Look, I want this covered up just you know snapped kind of covered up with this other thing so I can do that for it. So she kind of closed her eyes and she went into different worlds he comes out and he had like four times bigger than was needed this massive tattoo I'm going Didn't you feel like you know, it's come up on your breath. Now she said I just thought that he was positioning things I had no idea to look at. It was like, Oh my God. I got it. It looks good. It looks. But you mentioned that you've got coaches, how many coaches do you have between fitness coaches like coaches? Do you have a range of coaches every in your lifetime?

Jennie Bellinger :

I do. I have currently three coaches right now, all of them serving different areas. So I already mentioned Virginia and Scott, Virginia is my referral coach. My business coach works with me on that. Scott is my ohana coach helping me create community and I'm also working with a podcasting coach. So I'm so that way at my podcast is always working on improving and, and, you know, so I've got three right now.

Mark Laurie :

Across a stat someplace that successful people have usually between four to six coaches. in their lives, any given point in time that includes, you know, the fitness coaches so like person that's, you know your trainer that kind of kicks into it. And I thought that was fascinating. And I encountered a lady who was she was Laurel admires talking her back ago. And she had, she would go through coach. So you see these people the very very top of their game, and you discover that there's still someone above them and they're being coached themselves as they go as they kind of go up, which I was when I started off being coached and different things always struck my mind. So when you get really good, then you're done. And I discovered you the two ideas one is you will outgrow your coach as you learn what they learn and you move on if you're ambitious. And and secondly, that you once you've outgrown that coach, there's another coach that's higher than him and he was a cost more. Yep, that's the thing. I notice I've got one girl we're talking to and she was paying $250,000 a year for a coach and she would get him for an hour a month. Wow. And her eye she look my face like whoa, that's a lot of income. She says yeah, you have to understand how good he is like that hour is more powerful than price. Yeah. Definitely goes through. So what's he what's been your biggest adrenaline rush something that you've done that you just cannot believe I did. That was so exciting.

Jennie Bellinger :

Huh? Biggest adrenaline rush that's . . .Ah, God, I don't. . . there's been a few I maybe. Yeah, exactly. Um, biggest adrenaline rush. I'd have to say probably. I'm gonna go with going to Space Camp as an adult. Yeah. Okay. I'm a I'm a total nerd at heart. And I like I said I was I was in middle school space science teachers. The nerdiest job, probably you have, right? And I had the opportunity to go to space camp for teachers. And so we got to do some really cool stuff, including simulated space missions in actual NASA level simulators that astronauts are using. Oh, that would be cool. Right? And including some zip lining cuz some of that was some of the training is, you know, learning how to land in the water. So, yeah, so that was I would have to say that was pretty cool because it was a whole week of one adrenaline rush after the other. I mean, there were some time where we were sitting in an auditorium learning, rocket science, literal rocket science. But other times was the all of that. So I think that would have to be the biggest one because it was six or seven days of discussion. thing, a cool thing

Mark Laurie :

Did you find when you left there, you know, say years later that that experience really open up your mind for what you could achieve. Because you're being exposed with, you know, rocket science, the concept of space travel of man leaving the earth of all those things. That's a huge concept. did that affect you in a way that you took you take forward?

Jennie Bellinger :

Yeah, absolutely. Because I'm like, if we could send people to the moon, on the level of technology that we had in 1969, Mm hmm. Oh, my gosh, what is possible now from my, you know, from my own home, yeah. Right. And, and so it certainly opens the mind to two possibilities. And I think that, you know, because, you know, after having experienced that, I was like, man, I want to be an astronaut, but physically I can never be. So it's like, Alright, if I can't do that, what do I want instead? what's what's just as big right? So, you know, I was able to, it really did, it does open the mind to what is possible. It's like if we can go travel in space off of our already huge spaceship called Earth because we're on a spaceship right now. Yeah. hurtling through the cosmos at amazing speeds if y'all even knew your brain would explode, right? But if we can get off of that spaceship, and then come back to that spaceship like what else is possible? And it's all driven by people. And I'm a people and you're a people and, you know, so we're all the ones driving this in various different ways. So it's just, you know, what's possible from from you?

Mark Laurie :

Yeah, that is wild. That's Wild West has been a challenge to something that was a big stumble, like a failure or a disaster that you grew out of, and had a, I guess, a learning experience and right at the boat properly?

Jennie Bellinger :

Um, I guess. I mean, the most obvious one, I guess would probably be the fact that you know, going through a divorce right now, um, you know, because that's when you go Oh, okay, because I went through, um, you know, started that that process started right around the time that I started my, my, my current business, and it was one of those things where it was very, very difficult to be trying to build a business while you know, ending a relationship at the same time. Yeah. And so that right there just it slowed down my progress for the business but it increased It increased my speed of growth for myself. And certainly as I'm able to have conversations with clients around relationship, it, it informs that because it's like, you know, this was a place where I screwed up in my marriage and because I it's not that one is more to blame than the other in this case, it was, you know, a mutual thing. So, but I was also lucky enough to meet Scott around that same time. And so I regularly tell people, I'm meeting Scott and learning ohana saved my divorce. Hmm. Which is a weird way to put it. Yes. But when most people think of divorce, they think of people fighting and not getting along and whatever. And it's, you know, when people find out that my My almost ex and I because we still haven't finalized the process. We still live together two years later, two and a half years later. So we've been separated this whole time but we live together for the benefit of our children. We put ourselves you know, our own feelings second, do what's best for the kids and we're getting ready to now he's getting ready to move out because now we realize it's time for the kids now need him to move out. Yeah, you know? So it's, you know, there are stages. So, but ohana ohana, save that because I I was able to approach things from the ohana position instead of from Jenny's position of hurt and you know, all the things we feel when we're going through divorce.

Mark Laurie :

There is a lesson we learn. I do a lot of work with With divorce groups, a lot of our clients come in and going through breakups. We people arrive at us when they're going through something critical life turns out, and they had three points of view and the first point of view was how to make you feel. And in this particular case, this guy was talking to a guy that was his wife appeared late with the kids and he, he was she was dissing me. She was making me look weak, all sorts of stuff, right? He was furious, just really, really furious. He says, Well, what how do you think it what could have could have been went wrong? And, and he goes, Well, it could have been cheated. The kids are playing in my mid late there was a problem with a car he started looking at his tone start to soften. And they said, Did you find out what it really was? He goes yeah, turns out that she remembered was my birthday and the kids didn't have a present so they stopped in the mall. So the kids could buy a birthday card to give to me but never a chance to give it to me cuz I blew off the handles that was really stupid.

Unknown Speaker :

Aww

Mark Laurie :

So take us through the process to diffuse the anger was really it was really kind of wild. Doo doo guide yourself with an inspirational quote. I see you've got boards on the vision boards or the top. Go to the back. Do you have a quote to this near to your heart?

Jennie Bellinger :

Oh my gosh, so many of them. It just depends on the situation. I love inspirational quotes. I probably should have more of them around. Um, I I love the one from Maya Angelou. When you know better you do better.

Mark Laurie :

Mm. Right. That's good.

Jennie Bellinger :

That one's a good one. My probably the one that I say most often would be won by Ralph Waldo Emerson, which is your actions speak so loud. I cannot hear what you say.

Mark Laurie :

Oh, I like that one. That's very, very good.

Jennie Bellinger :

right. Yeah. I mean, literally it I love that one because it's it's so unbelievably true. Action speaks so much louder than words. Because words are so easy. They take virtually no no effort. Yeah. action takes effort. Yeah. And so if someone's acting differently than they're speaking, how they're behaving, is who they really are.

Mark Laurie :

Yeah. It's a it's a double edged sword. Because if you the disconnect, if you say you're gonna do this, and then you do that, that gives you power. But if you say you're gonna do this, and you wind up doing the other thing or doing nothing, that starts to combine itself as saying something you aren't going to do becomes an action as well that you're judged by.

Jennie Bellinger :

Yeah. And the one thing that comes from that quote, too, is the fact that inaction is an action, doing nothing. It does speak volumes when someone doesn't do something. They are telling you something.

Mark Laurie :

Yep, there's there's consequences, other good consequences and always a bad thing, consequences, just what happened. And a lot of people will pause they'll say, Well, if I just stick my head this and I'll be safe. I won't do anything and going No, there's, there's a price to be paid as you move through. As you move through life and engage with people, whatever you do will have good or bad consequences at a school to grow right around school and that's the main thing that she taught was and as their students got it live like if they misbehave they there's a there's a price to pay for it. So what is unique skill or talent when you sit back and say this, this is what defines who I am and what I do. Your natural ablity.U

Jennie Bellinger :

Umm if ah, my one thing I've been told by many people is my superpower is teaching. Teaching training, helping people begin to really understand certain concepts or learning a new way. It's just it's, it's, it's what I'm good at. And I think it comes from a background of having Psychology and educational background so my my degree is in psychology with a minor in communications and interpersonal communication specifically. So I know how to speak to people I know I know how to speak to the mind. And so by the time people leave, they've oftentimes had a shift in mindset knowledge understanding, like truly understanding something as compared to before we work together.

Mark Laurie :

That's a that's quite a skill set to bring to teaching to having the background of how the brain works and how people will take information in and you combine that with an with an actual tissue skillets makes you a scary person to troll that you. So that's what your badass podcast is about. Is that your business or the podcast kind of a side thing for you?

Jennie Bellinger :

both? So my, so my coaching practice is around direct sales, and then the The podcast is called badass direct sales mastery. So it's all about learning how to master the world of direct sales. So understanding that the business aspect, the discipline aspect of it, the sales and the mentoring piece that comes along with that. So BDSM though, you know, it's it's all part of understanding that so that the podcast is a way for people to have access to mentors that they probably never would have met otherwise. So I'm interviewing people who are high level or have been in the business for five years or more. And I chose that number specifically because there's a there's a study from the Federal Trade Commission here in the US that says that 90% of people are in and out of direct sales in five years or less.

Mark Laurie :

So tell once it the fire, they've lasted a long time.

Jennie Bellinger :

Yeah, they are statistically in the 10% and you Usually, that also means that they are statistically in the somewhere between one and 5%. of, of how much money they're making. So compared to the rest of the world of direct sales and network marketing, so I'm using my my podcast as a way to help, you know, connect people who are new or really wanting to learn about direct sales so that they can improve themselves improve their business, because direct sales and network marketing is a self improvement with a commission check involved.

Mark Laurie :

I love that definition. How's that most of women you deal with the come into to that arena?

Jennie Bellinger :

Yeah, pretty much I mean, I do. I do have some some men as clients. But I do end up primarily working with women because at any given time, it's somewhere between 74 and 76% of direct sales are female. You know, so a vast majority of my clients are women. Which is why I go After the Rockstar direct sales mom's because that's, that's who I am. That's who I be. Right? So they they connect with that that part because that was always me. You know, I mean, my Apple Watch has studs on it

Mark Laurie :

as you climb into this little niche of yours, is there anything you've had to give up to be derive the success that you've done? Is there anything you've had to discard or leave behind?In this level of success?

Jennie Bellinger :

Great question. Um Yes, there's a lot of things that I've given up, but they were all things worth leaving in order to achieve the level I'm at, um, procrastination. You know, it's still something I'm working on, but I'm way better at it than I used to be. Because I realized if I don't show up and get the things done, that my clients and my future clients need and get it to them. Now that you know, it makes Too late because I've got a certain window of time when they actually still are passionate enough about their business to go look for a podcast like mine you know but going through and I'd have to say let's see what else have I had to sacrifice? I mean if it's something that's worth losing isn't really a sacrifice

Mark Laurie :

occasionally when you're on pass there's there's you come across your own there's there's two choices that people have and they're equally desirable but you Okay, I'm gonna go on this one here and this one gets left behind and you know you

Jennie Bellinger :

well yeah. When you put it that way. I definitely not once not twice but now three times since I started my coaching practice have been actively heavily recruited by the company that I had been with to come back Please come back. We need leaders like you please come back. We need leaders like you. And and the one thing I know as as much as I know I could make an impact in the company, the world They want me to come back does not utilize my superpower my training my coaching um and so when they evenutally see that, well ,we can talk. um but for me my super power where I am best utilized as in working with people, in helping them number one identify their goals, number two helping them create an action plan that they need on a daily basis because entrupenurs whether you are a direct sales person or a traditional quote unquote entruopenoru the benifit of being in that kind of business is the flexiblity the disadvantage is the flexiblity.