Fascinating Women

Grace Yan - Mayoral Candidate -what makes her tick - her vision

July 05, 2021 Grace Yan Season 2 Episode 12
Fascinating Women
Grace Yan - Mayoral Candidate -what makes her tick - her vision
Chapters
Fascinating Women
Grace Yan - Mayoral Candidate -what makes her tick - her vision
Jul 05, 2021 Season 2 Episode 12
Grace Yan

Grace Yan is my guest. rather than the usual speaking points, we talked more about her character what drives her, how she got her values. What future she sees for Calgary, the impressive challenge of running for Mayor in Calgary, why would someone want to who is not a career politician.  
I think you will find some insights on Grace, where she comes from, why she is running, what it takes; all those behind the scenes type of info.

 Grace Yan
More about Grace on her website
https://graceyanformayor.com/about-grace-yan

About Mark Laurie - Host.
Mark has been transforming how women see themselves, enlarging their sense of sexy, expanding their confidence in an exciting adventure that is transformational photography. His photo studio is inner Spirit Photography. 
http://innerspiritphotography.com
https://www.instagram.com/innerspiritphotography/


Sound Production by:
Lee Ellis  - myofficemedia@gmail.com

Show Notes Transcript

Grace Yan is my guest. rather than the usual speaking points, we talked more about her character what drives her, how she got her values. What future she sees for Calgary, the impressive challenge of running for Mayor in Calgary, why would someone want to who is not a career politician.  
I think you will find some insights on Grace, where she comes from, why she is running, what it takes; all those behind the scenes type of info.

 Grace Yan
More about Grace on her website
https://graceyanformayor.com/about-grace-yan

About Mark Laurie - Host.
Mark has been transforming how women see themselves, enlarging their sense of sexy, expanding their confidence in an exciting adventure that is transformational photography. His photo studio is inner Spirit Photography. 
http://innerspiritphotography.com
https://www.instagram.com/innerspiritphotography/


Sound Production by:
Lee Ellis  - myofficemedia@gmail.com

introduction:

You're listening to fascinating with with Mark Laurie. And now, Mark Laurie.

Mark Laurie:

Well, hello everyone, it's Mark Laurie here from inner spirit photography, hosting the fascinating women and this time round. We have kind of unique guests normally, we're talking about people in their backgrounds and their stories and how they're kind of cool. But today we have the woman who could be the next Calgary mayor, which would be great. So I've got, rather than doing this off the fly. She's actually organized herself. She's very, very organized. This is amazing. This of course, is Grace Yan, and welcome, Grace.

Grace Yan:

Hi, Mark. How are you?

Mark Laurie:

I'm really good. Let me read what you gave me is a grace Yan is a businesswoman intrapreneur philanthropist who was born in Manila, Philippines and lived in Calgary for over 40 years. She has owned businesses work with and help businesses and sold businesses so she understands the needs and supporting businesses big and small. Businesses support an economy of friends and neighbors and build a community that thrives. Local businesses have a larger employer nationally in our community provide the most jobs in presence we need to encourage more startups. Grace Yan has also helped many calgarians from all walks of life transition and move to Calgary from many places around the world. Having grown up in Calgary, she is a passionate about the city and the diverse communities which made Calgary her home. She has a series of values that would kind of get into from inclusiveness, listening, accountability, integrity, business environment, nonpartisan and transparency. Her focus is on solutions and unity calgarians and he's uniting calgarians to all work together to achieve success, which is kind of the Calgary way. A Mayor as mayor grace wants to create an environment that is business friendly and which will help with job creation and which will enable support social issues. And Calgary where businesses can grow and families thrive in the cities that are in the best city of the lives to live in words can pray and I used to play sorry, not pray, Allah, we can pray as well. always welcome Grace. That was kind of the intro. Now.

Grace Yan:

Thanks Mark Yeah, that was awesome. Hello,

Mark Laurie:

Here we go. Now, normally, when you're Calgary. interviewing politicians, or politicians to be, we're trying to find out what their platforms are and where they kind of come from. But the purpose of our podcasts have always been what makes them like, what's the character? What's gonna bring them in, I believe that the platform is going to kind of come and go as, as the city changes and, and stuff comes up to it, but the core of who you are and and how you're going to rise those challenges as well. I'm far more interested in is that make sense to you?

Grace Yan:

Yes. That's perfect. That's Yeah,

Mark Laurie:

so we have a little bit of your background. What kind of things would prepare you to be mayor is is for some people go? Oh, I think I'll be mayor today. Like it's there's a there's more work? I think that people, we talk to people all the time that say, if I was in charge, I do this. Yeah. And then someone wants to come up and say, Well, actually, I do want to be in charge in this. So I'm going to do so what kind of things framed you were shaped you to consider this position?

Grace Yan:

Well, exactly. I mean, you don't wake up one day and say, I want to be mayor today. So it was a really collective, you know, series of events in my life, and working with Calgarians. And in businesses, okay, big and small, helping businesses grow, selling businesses, finding solutions for them, and hearing what their concerns were in the city. And then also working with just the public and helping them and hearing what they have to say, when they move to Calgary. You know, and, and then obviously, there's people from all walks of life that were saying, you know, Grace, this would be great if you do this.

Mark Laurie:

So to going back a bit further, because before all that happened, you would have had some what your what's your best characteristic, but the kind of thing that says this character is what prepares me for being a mayor,

Grace Yan:

it's that I'm solutions driven, and results driven. And, and, and all the training that I've done working with, you know, and my, my job as a broker, as in when I did residential real estate is all about finding solutions. Okay, I mean, I think people their human nature, it is to just think of the barriers. Yeah. Okay, what, what can we complain about today? But I trained my brain, okay, Mark, from an early age to think of solutions. So, you know, when you're talking to people, even customer service, it's all about well, we can do this, we can do this. Okay, but can you please tell me what you can do? Right and That's a better conversation, then what you can't do all the time, because there's always a solution. That's why there was a key for every lock. That's true, because there's always a solution. And it's just finding it. Let's find the solution.

Mark Laurie:

There's that famous phrase, it's, I think Henry Ford said, If you believe you can, or if you believe you can't, both are true.

Grace Yan:

You're right. Yeah.

Mark Laurie:

And that's what's gonna can happen within that we were talking before we came on air. And we're talking about your child, your, your Nathan, and your pride and joy. Now, back when he was growing up. You were talking about how you gave him positive feedback. And as you were talking, what kind of struck me is you look at things with intent. You serve this purpose. Yes. And so how, where did you find with that? How did that evolve into you?

Grace Yan:

I think, again, it's, you know, it's our experiences in life, where you reflect, and you say, look, you know, what would be the most productive way, positive way. And to, to get results. And you sort of have to think, you know, of your ultimate goal. Okay. And then you work from there. So, like, when we were talking about with with Nathan, because you're born with no likes or dislikes, or no opinions. So, of course, all I did was okay with Nathan. Oh, geez. Everything was delicious. Vegetables are delicious. They're just so yummy. And so of course, you know, and then, then Nathan doesn't become a he's not a picky eater. Yeah. And you just instill the confidence. And anything, thank it was the same with the city. You know, you just instill the confidence and know that we can be better. And here are the steps

Mark Laurie:

rising up into Yeah, I was taking so many coaching programs and assistance now, but one of them was talking about the confidence is the core thing for an entrepreneur. And he says, As soon as you feel that wavering, step back, find it, then go back into battle, or back into the swing of things. And he said, You know, when you're confident and you come across an obstacle, if your confidence, it's simply a road bump, you step over to move on, if you're not confident, if you don't believe in yourself, or believe is the solution, then it's a mountain and you got to climb it. And that's a, that's a defining viewpoint, I think that you're that you sort of step into

Grace Yan:

what exactly because we're always going to find there's always going to be barriers, you know, there's always going to be that bump in the road. But I'm, that's what I'm very confident about, right? finding the solution. And I have proven that over and over in my work, and then you know, what finding solutions is important to achieve success.

Mark Laurie:

Now, when you're looking for solutions, there's, I've noticed there's two people have to find solutions that there's a solution driven. And one guy goes, yes, because I am like the boss, I'm the guy that comes up with everything. And then I tell people what to do. The other person says, I find solutions, but recognize that I'm not the brightest person in the room is a whole bunch of other people may have other solutions. I create a team. Which way do you go?

Unknown:

Yeah, no, no, we need to create the team. I mean, there's no, there's no other way. And we have to work together. Yeah. And you don't come to solutions with people, you know, that are just always in conflict. Okay, so we have to create the team, the trust to work together to accomplish the goal of really looking out for the best interest of calgarians. That is the goal. Yeah.

Mark Laurie:

And then pull the team around, because you've got a pretty good team around you for your your campaign.

Grace Yan:

Team is amazing. I am so blessed mark, with the team that I have. And for every success, there is a great team. Okay, so my campaign manager is Wayne Steyr. So a lot over 11 years as a fund director of start.

Mark Laurie:

See, a lot of people tend to forget that that they've you see the the front of the ship, you might say the captain with it and you there. I mean, that happened, the good captain have a good vision, like a big vision, you can step into it, but a really good captain is the guy that's put a good first mate the whole team around them. So they've been kind of pulled in and people that really believe in them.

Grace Yan:

Well, I think you know what, I believe that you rise by lifting others. And so Wayne is an amazing campaign manager. I call him the Sherpa of climbing Mount Everest, right that we're doing here in my city. tend to Rosanna and she's top notch. You know, she's getting her business in front. I mean bachelor's in Fine Arts. She's an artist, like me. And, and she does huge sculptures. That's her major, huge sculptures. So she's amazing. And we've had Miss Teen Calgary join our volunteer team, Miss junior team, Calvary. I mean, we've got a team of just, you know, amazing, amazing role models. Yeah. Ya know, and, and we really, that it's so so community focused, you know, of giving back to the community as well.

Mark Laurie:

I've, the process to get to the mayor, chair, is daunting. Like, it's like, again, it kind of goes back where people say, yeah, this, oh, they should change things. But I think somebody else should do because I don't want the I want the glamour of the job, I want the power of the job. I don't want any of the work of the job. And it's a lot of work just to get up into it. How do you prepare for that?

Grace Yan:

Well, you know, first you take care of your health, your health is most important because it is a very grueling, grinding. Schedule. Okay. And it's a lot of forums. A lot of meetings. Right. So we're all very important and meeting the public as well. And making them aware that of, you know, what, what do you stand for? That you stand with them? Okay to accomplish a common goal. So yes, it's, you know, it's a very busy schedule, but it's fun for me. It's fun. Yeah, no, we had an event last week, it was groundbreaking for the Rizal monument was a national hero of the Philippines. Right. So I was huge event. I mean, you know, a lot of people got to talk to a lot of people. And it's, it's fun for me,

Mark Laurie:

you know, what is your big vision for Calgary?

Grace Yan:

It's really, to create an environment that's business friendly. And also, well, which will then create employment and help support social economic issues, right. But the key thing is to get people back to work. I don't know if you know, this, but 370,000 calgarians live on are below the poverty level.

Mark Laurie:

That's a serious number.

Grace Yan:

It increased by 40% after the pandemic. So that's nearly 30% of calgarians. You know, as a population of 1.2 million we have. So we need to get calgarians back to work. And that's I think, what's important right now,

Mark Laurie:

how's it mayor's chair, do that, from your one voice on the table of diverse people. And the province carries a whole bunch of weight in terms of money, what they can kind of do with it as, as the Government of Canada, what, what kind of things can a mayor do that's going to bring, so

Grace Yan:

we have to work closely with provincial and federal government, and work on programs that will help our city grow and thrive, to attract more businesses here, from all over the world. But it's really letting the world know that we are wide open for business. And that means we need to be we need to create an environment that's business friendly.

Mark Laurie:

How do you approach them the roadblocks they're going to happen? Like there's it's, it's one thing to say this is what we want to do, but there's roadblocks along the way. How do you approach those?

Grace Yan:

So? Yeah, again, you know, obviously, there's going to be barriers. And, and that's just part of anything, but of being you know, in business. But we find solutions we work, you know, with counsel. Right? And we work with the communities, we listen to calgarians and find solutions.

Mark Laurie:

What process Do you have to listen to Calgary's? How would you find their voice?

Unknown:

Well, and again, through what through Council, right and the various wards. We need that transparency, we need to engage calgarians and, and I think you're right, the messaging coming from the city to make it easier for capital calgarians to voice their concerns. That's something we really do need to work on.

Mark Laurie:

So I'm going to date myself a bit here. I was just a young kid, a young young. But one of my formative years was in the 18 Olympics, when the whole when Calgary came together in the middle of a winter heatwave. Without they know they solve problems by putting white sand on the on the football field to make it look kind of disappear. That was was a city I mean, as as much smaller city really coming together. In a world stage four, do you think that's still possible? In this day and age?

Grace Yan:

I think anything is possible, Mark, you know, with the right plan and strategy. Anything is possible. Okay. But it's really yeah. Again, engaging the right, you know, people to make it happen in a positive direction, we just need to move in a positive direction. Quickly.

Mark Laurie:

It's that whole That's kind of Hurry up and rush? And then yeah, wait, wait, wait while we rush, that kind of thing makes it kind of interesting for when you're a kid, again, still puzzling this, this, this thread of of the, as we're talking to you about your nature and our environment? And what kind of come into what kind of skill sets happened at a tender age when you're forming your personality? Yeah, that gave you the backbone, the vision to take on this kind of job.

Grace Yan:

You know, I mean, we are a product of our environment. And my parents are immigrants. They moved here in 1975. With $20, okay, yeah. And they both I mean, both, they were both teachers. And their degrees weren't recognized here. So they had to go back to school, right. And my mom became a nurse. And my dad opened up his own business. So, you know, my, until I've worked in, you know, my dad's business from a from a young age and hard work determination. I tell you, what was his business. So he owned a Appliance Repair Company. Okay. And back then, you know, you had your van and a phone and, and you just, you know, worked on mobile. And back then I was really, you know, that was innovative. Yeah, that was something new. Like to be mobile. And my dad was the one of the first people I think there bought one of those brick mobile phones, remember those $10,000 back then know, the

Mark Laurie:

power pack was like four feet deep, and

Grace Yan:

it was heavy, and you carried it like a purse? Yeah. And back then to even have one of those was, like, nobody had it. But you know, my dad, he had one and, and then it evolved from the big person to, to the brick into the you know, and no, he just worked hard. My both my parents worked hard. And we all worked in the business and, you know, at a young age, and we were delivering flyers for my dad, I was answering the phone. So you know, at a young age, you know what, I learned that hard work, and your mum was a nurse.

Mark Laurie:

And as I'm listening to you talk, I'm sort of seen the the trumpeter business person where business counts be innovative, you know, customer concerns. On the flip side, you've got this weird combination of your mother, in the health services, like her whole job is about caring, yes. And helping and not concerned. Fortunately for Alberta, with the economics of it, that's an unusual combination that shapes you a bit.

Grace Yan:

Yeah, exactly. I mean, my mom loved her job. And to her wasn't even a job. I mean, she worked every day, because she just loved it loved caring for people. And so I think it was a good blend of entrepreneur and the caring and compassion side from my mother. And, you know, I mean, I'm an orphan, like both both my parents have passed away now. Right. And, and my mom had pancreatic cancer. And my dad had dementia, actually, for a long, long, long time. So, you know, but they worked so hard, for, you know, to give us the best sort of life. And I think, to me, it's important to, to use those skills that they've taught me and to, to do better, and to help others and help the city to

Mark Laurie:

Yeah, I think that's a powerful combination, because most of the people don't they usually their parents are, in one vein, like they're both business people or their stay at home moms or something like that, to have that, that stark difference coming together is a pretty powerful thing. And then you've got Nathan holds Nathan now.

Unknown:

Nathon is 15 is going to be the 16 this year. Yeah, yeah. So, you know, it's, it's a different world for the youth right now. Yeah. You know, I was, I'm interviewed I do a lot of different interviews or you know, from the youth and I do I did several with sate right and the various schools have done three or four presentations to different schools as well. So kids call me all the time because they're doing a, you know, yeah. project on political science and, and they pick me as a mayoral candidate, right. Oh, I was getting hundreds, I'm getting hundreds and hundreds. Right. And, you know, with the youth, it's interesting what their concerns are, which is, you know, climate change. Transportation. Yeah. Right. And, you know, they really want an efficient transportation system. You know, and that's really important to them and, and that they can ride their bikes safely. Yeah, as well

Mark Laurie:

Thats where the rules change. When we grew up. speed was now I mean, the bikes can go that fast cars can go that fast. Yeah, so much, it's a much changing world. The bus is an interesting thing. I've been reading a lot lately of, of the things that the wealthy people or the wealthy part of society tends to forget about. So the poor part of the population has to take a bus ride, which will extend 40 minutes of their time to get someplace like it. It's if you can drive a car, you have to take the bus, there's loops and turns and forces. So there's a lot of built in disadvantages, barriers for someone who's struggling, who's trying to get beyond that poverty line up into there. What kind of programs could you help with them? Like what what kind of vision Can you share with them?

Grace Yan:

Well, poverty reduction is a huge concern, for sure. And so transportation is important. So in cities, for example, like London, and Hong Kong, that is a very efficient transportation system where you can just hop on, you don't need a car, it's actually very efficient. Have you been to London and I have been?

Mark Laurie:

Yeah, there's, I was astounded by it, they can actually like a cars a disadvantage.

Unknown:

Exactly. And so it's easier for the youth, or people to just get to a job or events, and, you know, to various places quite efficiently. So I think if we increase the, you know, different way, like the legs, we call them the lines, okay, red, green, you know, yellow, whatever. Yeah. And I mean, in big cities like New York, you know, Hong Kong, London, Paris, there's different, like, there's different colors. Green, it's rocket science, if you ask me, because there's so many layers. But it's so efficient. I mean, when you're not used to that. You're lost, you know, without this map.

Mark Laurie:

I remember I was with was a model were to birth as teaching through Europe and England, and so on. And of course, I'm people come to my studio here. I don't have to go very often. But she was a product of the train system. Yes. So we pull up into London. And to me, it's, like a maze schedules. And I'm like, okay, I can figure this out. She says, No, we'll just go here and there. Yeah, that quick. Yeah, it's obvious.

Grace Yan:

I know. I know.

Mark Laurie:

That this was instinctive.

Unknown:

Yeah, it was. So clear, every, whatever, 10 minutes. I mean, it's so fast, you don't even realize, you know, how long you're waiting? Because it's already there. So, and those stages those cities they are very vibrant.

Mark Laurie:

They are they transport? One thing we noticed was on them was that the it was agelessness made the wrong term. The It was a complete mix of people, you have people who are rich in the report, and this is the most efficient way to go

Grace Yan:

walks of life. Okay, even in Toronto, all walks of life. It's not like, Oh, my gosh, you're poor. You're taking the trip. They don't have that mentality. No, it's just it's the best way to go. It's the most efficient and it's almost like, well, if you're driving, what is wrong with you? Because it's way easier to take the train. So you don't have to park anywhere. So let's

Mark Laurie:

do the same thing we were so close the LRT Yeah. And if I've got means why we photographed your downtown The other day I we came down with LRT because it was just a whole bunch of issues is vanished. I don't know where things started parking where downtown. See, right? Being a mum, do you find that parents relate to better? Like, do you do that? Because as you're kind of talking to me, like, like 15 years old is, is that cusp of age, you've gone through the preteens and you're having prepare yourself for the next stage of it. Do you find you can relate to the parents their issues a bit more?

Unknown:

Yeah, a lot of parents speak to me, especially about youth again, in programs supporting the Youth and Sports right, because a lot of the youths are in sports and the education system that we can champion in the city. But yeah, I think you know, I talked to a lot of parents and and they they I'm so proud Should have have their feedback on, you know, programs we can improve on as a city.

Mark Laurie:

I'm kind of curious that so pilot politicians are kinda like business people marketing, here's my demographic, here's the people are gonna move the needle, the youth don't move it like they can't vote. So matter of whatever you say and help the youth, they're not going to elect you in this. In some cases, it could be two more terms before they have a voice, right? Why does a politician spend time listening to the youth? Why would you do that?

Unknown:

So the schools I've spoken with, and some of them are in grade six. But, you know, when speaking with them, and the issues that they are sort of bringing up, they hear from their parents, and then they'll go home, and then they'll talk to their parents about it. And there's a lot of youth that inspire their parents to vote. Okay, because, I mean, seriously, when you talk to the youth these days, they are so knowledgeable. They are really,

Mark Laurie:

though, you know, I think back when I was 13 and 15, and I did not have the weight of the world of my shoulders.

Grace Yan:

And you learn a lot when you just listen to what their concerns are. And, you know, I was speaking with another group last week of Friday's for future, right. And they're, they're, you know, main concern is on climate change. Right. Right. As seriously and, and, and how transportation does affect it. So let's roll cars on the road and, and, and more efficient transportation system will help everybody. I don't think people like to really drive anyway, the wouldn't they just rather, you know, get on a train and, and not be stressed about being in traffic and, you know, getting had to by, you know, getting in an accident, right? It's kind of stressful driving,

Mark Laurie:

I think there's two things that have to come into play is one is the convenience, I want to drive someplace I go to my car, I just drive, if I want to take the bus, if I'm not in a convenient spot, that's a bunch of different changes. Now I'm stepping out and carries different than like LA and Holland in these places. Because our weather is, is not always nice. And so that means you're going from you're waiting a bus stop for things to come and go, then you've got the good stuff, I can stop my car coming in my office, I think there's a lot of practical things. Like once you get on the bus, while it's really nice. What's the getting there, and then the gain off stuff that kind of has an impact.

Unknown:

You know what, Mark, you're right, because we have to make it convenient for people. And that's conducive to our weather. Now, as you look around the city, there are heated enclosures now, at the bus stops. They're great, right? I mean, some people are, I think are using them as conduits even. That that's pretty amazing that we've got these heated enclosures. Now, another concern that was brought up to me is yes, these enclosures are great, but they're not in places where people take the bus. So they're not positioned again, effectively, effectively in the right areas. Okay, so we really again, need to ask calgarians Where do you think, you know, are the best places to put these heated enclosures.

Mark Laurie:

Part of the problem is like I've been I've traveled extensively and I'll hit these European committed communities or different cities that have they from the ground up they were designed for commuters might say for, you know, for people like the buses and take carriages and so on for the carrier was designed as a car as a car city like it was. It's the biggest sprawling city I think in North America, like, people have got more space for capita, turning us into a comuter haven is going to be really hard and expensive, because it's just there's no,

Grace Yan:

it doesn't mean to be doesn't need to be expensive, if we plan this properly. But you're right. I know when, you know, I've worked with the people moving here. That's the first thing they say. You need a car to get around here and they're not used to it. Yeah, no, it's it's you need a car.

Mark Laurie:

Really simple. Like it's just there's everything as far away, as do I used to travel to in a while I can go cars in seconds, but the change of buses? You know, it's quite quite one of the problems that we have. I'm thinking back over the years is voting. How do you get people out to vote?

Grace Yan:

It's a messaging and so awareness. And I think, you know, this election is very different than any other election because of course, restrictions the pandemic. So everything has been virtual, right and So no one's ran a campaign like this, ever. Okay. So a lot of the messaging has been by social media has been by everything has been virtual, our campaign office has been virtual. So far, we've been respecting the physical distancing, we're not door knocking, because, you know, that might not, you know, be so safe for everybody. Both my volunteers for us or the homeowner, so we haven't been, you know, door knocking and just respecting that. So it's it is totally different. But right now, it is, you know, as early on as possible, we need to get the messaging out to get out and vote on October 18. Now, we don't have the the date yet for the advanced voting. But as soon as we do, I mean, you know, we have to get on that and get people to vote in advance if they're not going to be here, October 18. Right. But yeah, it's the messaging. And I think, you know, the city can also do, you know, a big, big marketing thing on voting, how important

Mark Laurie:

it is, it's been diminishing, as people become apathetic, the lives become busy and hectic. The availability to even get to it talks, we're talking about the, the people who don't have cars, who are gonna lose 30% of the population are going to have you know, that's the population that you talked about that are below the poverty line, they're gonna have a hard time getting time away from the job to go and vote. And then you got the issue of people, how knowledgable are they? Like, I was with a group of people one day talking about it. And the guy says, Yeah, well, like the person was blonde, that is like, so good looking. And going, Oh, my God, this city is a good looking people's health.

Unknown:

This is how people vote? I mean, you know, you're right. So there are people that aren't going to have a vehicle. And so we have that in place. For anyone that cannot get to a voting area. Just contact the campaign office. And we'll get you there. Okay. And you're right. I mean, how I was talking, I was talking to, I was talking to someone the other day, and it was just just a random person on the street, and we are talking about how people vote. And so this person says, Look, I don't know anything about politics. I don't know, platforms, policies, I don't even know the candidates. And she says to me, are you the only one running? That speaks volumes to me does? Because if you're, I mean, it's the same people in the political circle. So they're gonna know, the candidates. Yeah, you know, platforms, everything. But just random people to think I'm the only one money. That is amazing. Yes, I am.

Mark Laurie:

Of course, take average you can get what? What kind of problems do you think you'll encounter? In your bid to the to the mayor chair?

Unknown:

Well, I don't really see things as a problem, as just, you know, hopefully, we have a just a fair, Clean Election. You know, what we're seeing now? I mean, people are stealing my signs. Like, my signs are big Mark, they are four feet by eight feet. That guy. No, that's right. So, you know, but it is a serious offence, to steal campaign signs, or to actually, you know, even deface them or anything like that. So I think we just all have to be respectful. And just be kind to each other. But ultimately, it's calgarians. That will choose Yes. Who's the best person for the job and kick into it?

Mark Laurie:

Now, you haven't had any experience in politics before? Is this your first any type of venture in politics or when you're in school? Oh, yeah, of

Grace Yan:

course, I was president. You know, I was president and apparently no association. I was president of NAFTA. paralegal associate. I was the director. And I was president of many different boards, in the city, community boards, condo boards, you know, so, but no, I'm not a professional politician. I do not come with the baggage.

Mark Laurie:

I just come with really Yeah, like, like, that's one of the things with people who are been in politics for a while is there's, there's, there's debts owed, I guess, who may have it that they've, they're, you know, they've done some things back and forth and and good or bad. There's stuff. And so you've got one hand, you've got no baggage. The flip side though, politicians, thrive on connections? Do you have some of those like that?

Grace Yan:

Well, I have strong connections with Calgary of people of all walks of life. And really, you know, you get into this position because of your integrity. Right? So and that's how you continue. And you just be yourself, and really have the goal of looking out for the best interests of calgarians. You know?

Mark Laurie:

Do you feel you become less of yourself when you become mayor? Or do you feel that that simply enlarges who you are?

Unknown:

I think that you just share your values with calgarians. And, and we'll share a common goal with you too. I mean, we really just want Calgary to be thriving, to be the best city to live, work and play. And that's really what we want to do and accomplish. Yeah.

Mark Laurie:

The I hadn't heard that you're involved in so many presidents of other organizations. That is, that's a lot of work. I've been involved in those as well. And that's your long resume they just listed off there. Does that prepare you in some way for the bureaucracy, because that's what you're going to hit the greens, but they're Calgary's just because the big city has got a large piece of bureaucracy, but those minor roles kind of give you some tools.

Grace Yan:

Yeah, I think it gives you the structure of you know, that, you know, the different boards and in all the meetings and discussions and, and problem solving, because that's all you're doing really is again, finding solutions. It's all about finding the solutions, and as effectively and efficiently as possible. And that means cutting red tape. And because time is money, yep. And we don't have forever, you know, we need to get Calgary back on its feet. And just a fresh new change as quickly as possible.

Mark Laurie:

Does cutting red tape involved putting a lot of times the red tape some built up to protect people and things. Does the red tape put those back at risk? Or is it just you find red tape? That's just a nuisance?

Grace Yan:

I mean, if it delays progress, right, I think we can find a better solution. Because, you know, time is money. And you know, when we have people companies from all over the world coming here and saying, wow, you know, it's gonna take me six months for a permit or, you know, to get everything in T is done permits and processes finalize. First city that's so Dad, this doesn't make sense, right? You know, when they've got offers from Singapore, Netherlands all over the world, I don't know, we will do it in a week. Because we're kind of competing to building you know,

Mark Laurie:

that's what's changed is we're now at one time we're competing with other companies, like locally, you know, somebody that come across the country. But now with especially after the pandemic, people emerge and discovered, well, we can live in where we want. And we can have our business headquarters anywhere we want in the world. So now that puts Calgary at different stage doesn't that they have to sort of fight for both our identity and

Grace Yan:

one, we have to focus on what, what we do have that's beneficial, and the benefits that we can offer to businesses around the globe? And I mean, wouldn't it be exciting to see in the Calgary Herald building? That's good? Yeah, I mean, to see like Google, Microsoft, I mean, because our weather is conducive to data centers. So you know, stuff. I mean, and that alone will, you know, save the money, these companies money on energy, we have our healthcare might not be the best, but it's still better than what they have in the US. I mean, just some simple things, really will attract these businesses here. But it's, it's making them aware of our benefits that we can offer. Because

Mark Laurie:

there's a lot that we happen. How do you approach innovation like that that word comes up an awful lot? It's kind of a vague word, then you have to be innovative, what is the practical ways to be innovative?

Grace Yan:

Well, you're right, it is a huge range to be innovative. But, you know, there's companies like Lego and Google that are able to innovate, okay. And they pick places where, okay, there's talent. We've got the talent To hear, you know, Mark, and also I mean with our education system, and, and also the existing talent that we have with the engineers that were in oil and gas, we can retrain them into other areas for technology, water, you know, agriculture, you know, they can just be retrained. Right. But it is important to innovate. And right now, I think we can, while we are talking a lot of it, but I

Mark Laurie:

do cover we're coming a bit of a center for that, I've noticed that there's a lot of headlines about the IT people coming in just kind of the future of thepossibilities.

Unknown:

I mean, we need to fill those powers. What do you do in the 30% vacancy? So

Mark Laurie:

that's almost unimaginable from you know, I've been living in Calgary for so long, and and to see our the downtown area, so quiet. And so dad is it's unprecedented. As for Calgary, and like me,

Grace Yan:

so what I mean, is 200 million being injected right now to downtown revitalization. So, you know, in business, people are telling me Well, you know, that's our tax dollars that we're paying into. Yeah, but we're not there anymore. So is there a better way that we can utilize that money to have a better return? You know, so different places different? Of course, everyone has, you know, their different interests and what they think the 200 million should be better used to have a better return and, and somebody said, Well, if we had a Formula One track, that would put Calgary on the map, and the return would be billions.

Mark Laurie:

And had not even thought about that.

Unknown:

So if we arrived right, right away, if you have a form of Formula One track, you're on the map. Right, right. And that exposure all over the world, and the business that it brings. And then I mean, I think we have to look at various options, how we can utilize public money, you know, more effectively to have a better return on investment. You know,

Mark Laurie:

it's a bold step, but bold is what's needed isn't it,

Grace Yan:

we need something huge. That's what he did he mean, something big to make a big change. Like that. Okay. Now, I'm not saying we should, you know, just start this formula one track, right? Something like

Mark Laurie:

Something like it something like that goes, what's happening over here

Grace Yan:

or something? Because we need to attract the world. We need something to say why come to Calgary, okay. So that we create awareness for Calgary in Formula One track or have the first indoor Disney in the world. Okay, so Anaheim Disney is only 40 acres. And it's usually outside Disney is always outside of things, the big cities. I've been to most Disney's in the world. So if we had the first indoor Disney in the world, okay. And the first indoor Universal Studios in the world. That would be exciting. That would be very exciting. And it would be conducive to our weather. I've already spoken with Disney. Really? Oh, yeah. I just don't talk about things aren't. Remember, I do things. There's intentful stuff. So you know, you just do it? Yeah. So you know, we've got the conversation started. Because this is something we really need something big to have big changes. And that would bring, obviously, you know, attention from the world, we'd have tourists coming, it would help with our economy would help with jobs.

Mark Laurie:

So what you're doing is before you bring up these ideas, because until that was injected in the conversation, it struck me like, Oh, yeah, let's dream some more. But you're not just dreaming. You're you've actually done background work on these kinds of things. So you, you're setting things up with your intentful approach. And then these things come up as things in progress, not just as a pipe dream to start with. That's fascinating. It's action creates success. That's perfect. That's we're gonna wrap this up on action, create success. I love that. That's. You have some questions? No, you wouldn't ask me about quotes that I like, Oh, yes. Give me some quotes. So sorry. This is a bit of an off step thing. And when I was when she was preparing this, because she's a very prepared girl, it was like, What's this about? And I said, Well, one of the things I like to know is what kind of quotes drive you because I believe quotes are very personal for people and they're the things that you can get a hint of where they're gonna go and come so please give me some of the quotes that that means something to you. Yeah.

Unknown:

So in my when I released my statement when I was running for more than I'm running for mayor. I Also included this quote, Muhammad, Muhammad Ali, he said it well, service to others is the rent to pay on Earth. Okay, and this is another half grab five, we shine bright so that others may shine brighter. That's your hand say Salomon, we rise by lifting others. Life is beautiful not because of the things we see or do. Life is beautiful because of the people we meet. But Simon Sinek behind every success, there was a great team. The greatest wealth is health. And a world where you can be anything, you can be kind. So I just wanted to really, in closing, say to Calgary, I want you to know I've heard you, your causes my cause our city needs your ideas, energy and passion. That is the only way we can turn out progressive platform into real change for Calgary. Your voice, your choice. Now let's go let's go out there and make it happen. together.

Mark Laurie:

That's beautiful. I it's for having time left of course to the end because we've I can each quote kinda was read off I'm thinking parts of the conversation that revealed how that quote drove you. I was sort of the fabric of your life. And and it's I think it's exciting having a powerful woman I in the chair for the for the mayorship, I think it's and an immigrant, there's a whole bunch of say boxes are checked off. But things that are a good time to have them happen. Like the mentality of Calgary, the mentality of of where things are going for a change, something fresh and something different, something powerful. And I think you arrive with all of that. Like I'm I as you know, I'm one ofyour stanch supporters, as far as I think you're wonderful at what you're going to set out to do. I've been involved in different ventures over the years and you're very impressive person. So thank you for for coming. And joining me today and our serve our special audience. have hope you have enjoyed this and got the insights for what is one of Calgary's most eclectic and interesting Mayor candidates who I think should do very well. She gets to sit in that chair. Thank you for coming. Thanks, everyone.

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This has been fascinating women with Mark Laurie. Join us on our website and subscribe at fascinating women dossier fascinating women has been sponsored by inner spirit photography of Calgary, Alberta and is produced in Calgary by Leo's and my office media.